All posts filed under: Homeschool Made Easy

The One Thing that Helps You Survive a Crazy, Hectic, Bang-Your-Head-on-the-Wall Homeschool Day

I’m excited to have my friend Jenny Herman share with us today. Jenny is the author of The Power of One, an inspiring look at one simple strategy that helps us ordinary moms overcome the roughest days. Today she explains how we can turn those days around. Even better–she’s giving away her book to a lucky reader! Read on to find out how to get a copy AND a free resource! Let’s face it. Just like classroom teachers, homeschool parents have crazy, hectic, bang-your-head-on-the-wall homeschool days. Oh, sure, we may appear like confident, put-together homeschoolers, but really we get frazzled just like everyone else. Why? Oh, I don’t know. Maybe it’s the Dishes holding the sink hostage, spilling over to all available counter space. Toddler Destructo who takes everything apart while you teach the older kids. Heartbreak of a challenge like dyslexia or apraxia. Child who just can’t get that math concept, no matter what you try. Difference between your teaching style and your child’s learning style. Stress of financial issues pressing into your thoughts while you …

Homeschool mom, are YOU learning? #homeschoolmadeeasy

Homeschool Mom, Are YOU Learning?

Sometimes we set out to write an article about one thing, and we end up saying something more important. Just like sometimes we try to teach our children something, and then we end up learning something ourselves. This came home to me a couple weeks in recent remarks Jonathan Lewis made about my article in the current issue of Home School Enrichment Magazine. We must keep learning, fellow mommies. We are the tired mommies, the busy mommies, the educating mommies, the coffee-guzzling mommies. But we must also be the learning mommies. I needed this reminder: Hey, Parents, What Are You Learning? In the upcoming issue of Home School Enrichment Magazine, Lea Ann Garfias shares an article entitled “7 Surprising Lessons I Learned from Teaching My Children to Read.” It’s a good article, but my point here isn’t to give away all the lessons she learned. Instead, I’d like to point out the underlying truth behind her article: the importance of learning for us as parents! You see, Lea Ann was the one trying to be the teacher. She …

7 Reasons You are Not Making Homeschooling Easy Enough

7 Reasons You are Not Making Homeschooling Easy Enough

Homeschooling is hard. It shouldn’t be. Homeschooling should be important, it should be a priority, it should be a dedication, it should be a mission. Homeschooling should be easy. Not hard–easy. I complicate matters the more I do them. I start something, get going, and then once I get it figured out, I say, “Hey, we could super-awesomize this entire process! Let’s see how super-awesome-stupendous we could make this if we try harder…and harder…and harder…” And I keep going until I burn myself out. I’ve done it with baking (I don’t bake any more), I’ve done it with work (until my family begged me to stop), I’ve done it with housecleaning (one brutal, lonely year in which every surface shined and I had no social life). And I’ve done it several times with homeschooling. Then suddenly, I wake up one day so exhausted before my head lifts from the pillow, my first thought a swirl of “oh, no, did my son finish that project?” and “oh, no, did my daughter memorize all 50 vocabulary words?” …

10 warning signs your child is a kinesthetic learner

10 Warning Signs Your Child is a Kinesthetic Learner

When we begin delving into learning styles, the first thing we want to know is what style is my child? It’s a good thing to know, because once we recognize our child’s learning superpowers, we can help him harness that energy. Suddenly, learning is much easier and a whole lot more fun for everyone. It’s pretty easy to find the visual and auditory learners — they are the “good students.” Our traditional educational models favor reading and listening to explanations, so the visual and auditory learners are the “good students.” They are voracious readers or they are the first to ask questions and remember your answers. Since they get instant gratification — we buy them more books and we answer their questions — they are non-stop learning machines from toddlerhood on. And then there are the kinesthetic learners. Poor guys, they are so misunderstood. They frustrate us in their insistence to march (literally) to their own beat, and they frustrate themselves with their inability to fit into the school mold (even in homeschooling). So they get labeled more easily …